Wrapping it Up – ASL in Six Weeks

I chose to learn American Sign Language for a number of reasons. As an educator, American Sign Language will help me communicate with colleagues, parents and students who may be deaf or hard of hearing. My partner also has family members who are deaf, and I wanted to be able to fully communicate with them. I also work in the service industry, and want to be able to accommodate any customer I might encounter to the best of my ability. Simply put, I want to open my lines of communication and be as inclusive as possible as a person communicating in a world with others.

My Goals

When I began the ASL learning project, I set out to use lifeprint.com, and complete lessons 1-15.

Lets all take a minute to stop and laugh.

I had no idea how difficult it would be to learn American Sign Language in six weeks, and in setting that goal not only did I overestimate my ability, but I underestimated the difficulty of such an important skill, and the ability of all those who use ASL to communicate every day. After the first week, I decided to see just how far I could progress myself, without setting a goal for the end of the semester so that I could learn at my own pace, and not pressure myself to learn too much too quickly.

Technology Used

The first website I tried to use for learning ASL was lifeprint.com, which features the American Sign Language University.

 I didn’t really like the layout of the website or the order of the lessons, so before I ever used it for a lesson, I found two new resources: ASL THAT and signlanguage101.com.

I really liked ASL THAT because of the simplicity of the videos, such as the video I used to learn the Alphabet.

via YouTube

What I liked a lot about the signlanguage101.com videos, were that they were full, comprehensive lessons, and the teacher always included language tips and tips about deaf culture, so that you weren’t just learning basic ASL, but learning how and why certain rules existed, such as in this video I used to learn gestures.

via YouTube

As I continued on, I started to branch out and find more resources, such as Signing Savvy, an online English-ASL dictionary, and Sign Language Blitz.

I also found great videos from the South Dakota School for the Deaf’s YouTube Channel, such as this one, that I used to learn adjectives.

via YouTube

Finally, the last resource I found is the one I wish I had found first, Rochelle Barlow’s website and YouTube Channel, which featured lessons from beginner to expert, and downloadable worksheets that help learners keep track of progress at home.

What I liked about the use of technology for this project was the fact that I was able to use many different resources of my choosing, and choose lessons that I felt that I wanted to do. I was able to skip any lessons I wanted, and learn any lessons I wanted. This helps make learning more personal and tailored for learners. I also loved being able to film myself each week and watch myself as I progressed. When I got bored, I could simply look around on Twitter and other online spaces to find new resources to use.

Progress

Week 1: Choosing ASL

  • A goal was set 
  • Resources were chosen 
  • Basic outline of my learning plan

Week 2: The Alphabet, Gestures and Body Language

  • The Alphabet (A-Z)
  • Yes/no, come on, car, swim, no way, whatever, I don’t know, what’s up, drink, house, key
  • Facial expressions

Week 3: Colours, Pronouns and Basic Phrases

  • Colours: red, blue, yellow, white, black, green, orange, pink, purple, tan, brown and grey 
  • Pronouns: he, she, them, they, it,  you, me, they, we, my, you, your, ours, myself, yourself, themselves, ourselves, someone, each other and other. 

Week 4: Everyday Signs and Verbs

  • Yes, no, maybe, good, want, don’t want, restroom, lights on, lights off, go, stop
  • Verbs: Eat, drink, jump, walk, run, sit, stand, sleep, sleep, fly, fly, cry, wake up, stop, pick up, push, pull, open, close, wash, kiss, throw, drop, hit, hit, cut, fall, hug, drive, turn around, kick, pour, pour. 

Week 5: Common Phrases, Adjectives and Basic Sentence Structure

  • Hello, goodbye, how are you, see you later, see you tomorrow, my name is, what time is it, yes, no, please, thank you, welcome, I’m fine, excuse me, be careful, good morning, good afternoon
  • Adjectives: Hot, cold, big, little, happy, sad, clean, dirty, broken, red, blue, green, yellow, orange, purple, black, white, pink, brown, one, two, three, yucky, silly, soft, fast.
  • Sentence structure 

Week 6: Numbers and Animals

  • Numbers 1-30
  • Animals: Cat, dog, elephant, rabbit, bird, duck, fish, cow, monkey, bear

Wrapping it Up

So just how much did I learn in six weeks? Well to recap, to start with all I knew was a few letters of the alphabet, and by the end of six weeks, I had learned:

  • The Alphabet (A-Z)
  • Yes/no, come on, car, swim, no way, whatever, I don’t know, what’s up, drink, house, key
  • Facial expressions
  • Colours: red, blue, yellow, white, black, green, orange, pink, purple, tan, brown and grey 
  • Pronouns: he, she, them, they, it,  you, me, they, we, my, you, your, ours, myself, yourself, themselves, ourselves, someone, each other and other. 
  • Yes, no, maybe, good, want, don’t want, restroom, lights on, lights off, go, stop
  • Verbs: Eat, drink, jump, walk, run, sit, stand, sleep, sleep, fly, fly, cry, wake up, stop, pick up, push, pull, open, close, wash, kiss, throw, drop, hit, hit, cut, fall, hug, drive, turn around, kick, pour, pour. 
  • Hello, goodbye, how are you, see you later, see you tomorrow, my name is, what time is it, yes, no, please, thank you, welcome, I’m fine, excuse me, be careful, good morning, good afternoon
  • Adjectives: Hot, cold, big, little, happy, sad, clean, dirty, broken, red, blue, green, yellow, orange, purple, black, white, pink, brown, one, two, three, yucky, silly, soft, fast.
  • Sentence structure 
  • Numbers 1-30
  • Animals: Cat, dog, elephant, rabbit, bird, duck, fish, cow, monkey, bear

They say that you are fluent in a language once you have one thousand words in your vocabulary, and while I’m quite far off, I can see it becoming a real possibility as I continue to study ASL. Is it as much as I would have liked to learn? No, but I’m just getting started, and I enjoy being able to go at my own pace. I can’t wait to continue learning ASL, and keeping my blog and Twitter up to date on my progress.

Thanks for joining me on this learning journey!

-Kali

 

 

 

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Learning ASL – The Fun Stuff

This week to finish off my learning project, I decided to learn some more basic, but important words in American Sign Language: numbers and animals!

I had already learned some of the numbers in previous weeks, but I really wanted to solidify my knowledge of numbers up to 30. I went back to the first YouTube video channel I tried, ASL THAT.

via YouTube

Here was my attempt after some practice:

One thing that I wasn’t crazy about when following along with this video was that it didn’t display the numbers in  on the screen, or say them out loud so it would have been difficult for someone who needs to pause the video to follow along.

After this, I decided for my final lesson that I would learn the signs for different animals. I decided to use another “First 100” video from the South Dakota School for the Deaf, “First 100 Animals”.

via YouTube

I really liked that each sign seemed to just focus on a characteristic of the animal (except for dog), which made the signs really easy to remember!

I really enjoyed the entire process of learning ASL, and will definitely keep working on it! Stay tuned for one more learning project post: the wrap up post, and follow me on Twitter to stay updated about what I’m learning next!

Coding the Colours of the Rainbow

For this week’s blog post we were asked to use one of the coding websites provided (Scratch, Hour of Code , Code Academy) to code a short project. I chose to use Hour of Code, which has a ton of different projects to choose from!

I decided to go for this really cool looking project called Street Artist, which runs on a coding website called Kano.

I started off with the tutorial, which was really user friendly and easy to follow along with!

I really liked the instructions at the top, because they would often say “Stop and read the code, what do you think will happen?”. They really want learners to understand why a command will do what it does. After I got to level 1, I continued on making a spray paint effect.

After I learned how to code the spray paint effect, I learned how to do it in a bunch of cool different ways, like a rainbow changing spray paint.

Finally I made it to the end and scored a sweet Street Artist Master Badge!

What I really enjoyed about the coding experience was that the instructions weren’t just there to guide learners, they were here to help learners understand coding on a deeper level by asking them questions about why certain codes will do certain things. I can absolutely see the benefit of teaching coding in schools. As technology in our world continues to advance, many more jobs are going to start appearing where coding is the focus. Coding itself is also a great way to have students think logically and carefully about each step that they’re taking, and why each step is so important!

Learning ASL – Common Phrases, Adjectives and Basic Sentence Structure

This week to continue my ASL journey, I finished the last half of signlanguage101.com‘s video, “Lesson 3: Everyday Signs and Common Phrases”

via Youtube

A good language tip that I learned from this video is that when you’re fingerspelling, it really doesn’t matter which hand you use!

From here, I moved on to the South Dakota School for the Deaf’s “100 Adjectives” video.

via YouTube

What was nice about this video was that I already knew some of the signs! I remembered learning the colours just a few weeks back, so this video really helped solidify that knowledge.

I also watched this video that I saw in the YouTube sidebar titled “Sign Language Sentences- The Basic Structure”. The video is by Rochelle Barlow, who I found out also has her own website and program for learning ASL.

Rochelle’s video was really insightful and helpful! Even though I’m still a beginner, these tips will really help me as I progress even after the Learning Project is done. She has a lot of other videos and resources, and even has a link in the description of this video to a page on her website where you can download worksheets.

I decided to try it out, and it asked for my e-mail address and first name so that the worksheets could be sent to me via e-mail.

I downloaded the worksheets, and honestly I wasn’t expecting much. Rochelle features a lot of free content on her website but I know that a lot of her content has to be paid for, so I was a bit worried that the free worksheets would’t be that great — but boy was I wrong.

I’m a sucker for pink. I’m also a sucker for beautiful fonts, so these worksheets had it all for me. They are easy to follow, provide examples, a recap of what was learned and answers. They are printable as well, making things just that much easier.

Rochelle’s website and YouTube Channel are resources that are absolutely amazing for people learning ASL, from beginners to experts. I really like her teaching style, as well as the range of content available. I only wish I had found it sooner. Join me next week as I wrap up with some fun stuff: numbers and animals, and don’t forget to follow me on Twitter.

 

To Tech or Not to Tech

Technology can be an engaging, efficient way to run daily activities in the school and classroom. So what happens when a teacher is reluctant to use technology because they don’t want to, are afraid to or simply don’t know how? Below is a sample conversation between Ms. D., a tech savvy teacher, and Ms. K., a teacher who is wondering about technology in the classroom.

Ms.K is a very traditional teacher. She does not care for technology use in the classroom and takes away the students devices before each class. She has never cared to learn about any of the new digital tools available for teachers and does not understand how technology can be more effective than a paper and pencil.

Ms. D is a tech-savvy teacher who loves to use technology in the classroom, believing strongly that it will benefit her students in the end to be tech literate. She is always trying to find new ways to integrate technology in her classroom, and this year decided to use Google Classroom for much of her class work.

-A conversation between Ms.K and Ms.D in the high school in which they both teach at:

Ms. K: I cannot understand why my students keep talking about your classes and how fun they are. They must not be learning anything if they are on the internet the whole time.

Ms. D: Oh Ms K., they’re just on Google Classroom. It’s a place for the class to meet online. I can post lesson material like Powerpoints and documents for them to see, and they can hand in assignments and receive feedback. Plus,I can send out reminders to them!

Ms. K: Aren’t those reminders just giving them an excuse to have their phone out in class? I make sure my students keep their phones put away during class so they aren’t distracted by things like that.

Ms. D: Well you’re right there, Ms. K., but the students are probably going to be on their phones anyway, no matter how hard we try to get them off. Why not embrace what’s already happening and use it to engage students? At least Google Classroom gives them something to do on their phone that isn’t just texting or social media, and it can help them to understand how useful technology can be for things other than those.

Ms. K: Well, I have seen Google Classroom and it does not look efficient at all. It would take me too long to add all of my content onto each class when I could just keep my Powerpoints and Word Documents. Also, if I need to remind or inform my students on anything, I can do so in class. If I used Google Classroom, I would be encouraging my students to go on their devices instead of learning the curriculum. It does not seem like a tool that would benefit me or my students.

Ms. D: Well it might take a little while for everything to upload and add, but in the end it is a great time-saver! If everything is on Google Docs, it makes it easy for students to collaborate on a project without needing to get together. And as much as we like to think we’re being heard in class, how often do students forget about important events and due dates? With Google Classroom they have access to the classroom calendar so they never have the excuse of not knowing when something is due. Plus, it has the added benefit of keeping students who may be sick or away caught up on class activities!

Ms. K: I guess that is a good point. If I would be saving time and keeping students up to date, then maybe I should try Google Classroom out. But I am a bit nervous to start using my computer, I do not know much about technology. And what about student privacy? Aren’t my students more vulnerable if their information is on the internet?

Ms. D: I can come and help you after class tomorrow and we can run through it together! There are so many neat things that you can do with Google Classroom, and plus, you are saving paper! It is also very private, so it can be a safe place for your students to learn about digital citizenship, which I can also show you tomorrow! You should read this article that I found this week about 6 reasons why Google Classroom is such a great tool for teachers!

Ms. K: Okay, that would be great. I am excited to check this new tool out! I think that my students will also be excited to hear that I am engaging in technology as well. Thanks!

 

When Trolling Becomes Bullying

Watching Monica Lewinsky’s TED Talk, I couldn’t help but think back to high school. when in I was in grade nine, an eighth-grade girl sent naked pictures to her boyfriend, who sent them to everyone he knew. She came to our school the next year, but a good majority of the school had seen her naked before she even became a student. She would be the first of so many girls I knew or had heard of that had made the same mistake, and although many would pretend it didn’t bother them, I knew how I would feel if it were me who had done the same thing. Every one of these girls was like Monica Lewinsky, nothing but fodder for an internet willing to rip anyone and everyone apart.

via Whisper

I grew up in the digital age, and I went to high school during a time where the internet and cell phones were firmly set as our means of communication. I was in tenth grade when Amanda Todd, a girl living in Port Coquitlam killed herself in her family home because of cyberbullying. I witnessed, even after her death, memes featuring Amanda’s picture, with phrases like “Make a mess of life? Drink some bleach”. My peers and I learned early on that no matter how unbearably tragic your situation might be, people on the internet will always be ruthless in their bullying on the internet.

We learned to watch what we posted, and counted the likes we got on every picture, deleting the ones that we didn’t think got “enough”. What we didn’t learn, was how to navigate all of this. From my own experience, there was no class that taught students how to interact on the internet. I do remember the terrible ads and posters put up that were supposed to help prevent us from sexting or bullying online, but this was not a proactive approach — students my age were already doing these things. We were told not to bully online,  or sext, but we weren’t taught how to build a positive online presence. And while we weren’t learning about how to defend ourselves through a positive online presence, the notion of the keyboard warrior grew more and more each day.

2WPhoto via Flickr

So as a teacher, what do I do with this? I believe it is my responsibility, and the responsibility of all teachers to educate their students not only about the repercussions of posting anything to the internet, but how to behave in the online world. It is very likely that every single one of our students will have a digital identity, and so it is up to us to ensure that they don’t make the same mistakes that our generation did.

We learned the hard way, but our students don’t have to. We won’t ever be able to stop students from having online identities, whether or not we choose to use those in the classroom. The fact is that although the internet can be devastating for some, for so many others the internet and their digital footprint are a large, positive part of their life in the form of relationships, both professional and not. Having a positive online identity can be a wonderful thing, and it is up to us to ensure that students are able to navigate the internet in a way that they can build a positive digital footprint, while avoiding the pitfalls of the internet.

 

 

Grade Six – A Boy and a Mountain (Suspense) Plan

Check it out on Google Docs

Subject/Grade:  6 ELA Lesson Title:  A Boy and a Mountain Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

Outcome: Select and use appropriate strategies to construct meaning before (e.g., considering what they know and need to know about topic), during (e.g., making connections to prior knowledge and experiences), and after (e.g., drawing conclusions) viewing, listening, and reading.

Indicators:

    • predict what text will be about (e.g., consider the accompanying visuals and headings)
    • connect and construct meaning (e.g., make connections to own lives and contemporary issues and problems; make connections to self, text, and world)
  • ask questions (e.g., ask questions to check understanding and evaluate text’s message)
  • respond personally (giving support from text) (e.g., support thinking beyond the text with specific evidence based on personal experience)
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

-I can make predictions about the story based on the title and pictures

-I can make self, text and world connections about the story

-I can ask questions when I am not understanding what the story is telling me

-I can think about why this story is suspenseful, and reflect on suspenseful situations in my own life

Essential Questions:

PRE:

What do you think this story will be about?

What makes this story suspenseful?

What are some key elements of a suspenseful story?

A Boy

Prerequisite Learning: Need to be able to read, write and understand suspense.

Instructional Strategy: Read aloud, written reflection

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

Non-Formative: brainstorming, noting those students who ask questions when they don’t understand

Formative: Written reflection

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):                               Length of Time: 5 minutes

Ask the students what they have learned this far about suspense (they began the unit last week)  and respond to those who raise hands. We will write these answers on the board for reference

Development:                              Time: 60 Minutes

  • Before the story is read, we will pass out a handout that asks the following questions:
  • From looking at the pictures and title, what predictions can you make about the story?
  • Write down one text to text, text to world and text to self connection you found in the story.
  • Was there anything in the story you didn’t understand or want to know more about?
  • What made this story suspenseful?
  • Do you remember a suspenseful time from your own life?
  • We will ask students only to answer the first question before reading
  • The story is read aloud by the class. We will ask for volunteers to read, and if no one volunteers we will choose. Students will read 2 lines each until the end of the story. If someone wants to volunteer to read the next line, they will raise their hand.
  • After the story is complete, we will ask the students to fill out the handout

                                 

      Learning Closure:  We will ask for volunteers to share one of                      their connections. Ideally this would be about ten students but can be adjusted according to time.

                                       Time: 15 minutes

Materials/Resources:

  • Nelson Literacy books for each student (32)
  • Handout for each student (32)
  • Whiteboard
  • Dry erase markers

Possible Adaptations:

Differentiation: If the development goes quicker than 60 minutes, the closure will include more student examples to compensate time.

Management Strategies:

-Ask students before hand to raise their hand if they have questions or would like to volunteer

-Use our presence as a management strategy, moving around the room and placing a hand on shoulders of students who need to refocus

-Raise hand and hold it up to refocus students if they are discussing and at beginning of class

Safety Considerations:

-Students might relate to what the story is about and might be emotionally affected by this discussion

Stage 4: Reflection

Grade Six – My Choices: Who Influences Me Plan

Check it out on Google Docs

Subject/Grade: Grade 6 Social Studies     Lesson Title: My Choices: Who Influences Me      Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

Outcome:

Examine the relationship between an individual’s power and authority and the power and authority of others.

Indicator:

(a) Illustrate the forms of power (an individual or a group’s ability to influence): force, authority, and influence (voice) with respect to their personal lives (e.g., force: pushing someone, saying something hurtful; authority: being elected class representative, being invited to act or speak on behalf of the group, inviting others to act or speak on behalf of the group; influence: speak out on their behalf or on the behalf of others).
(f) Explain choices young people must make in reconciling the tensions between the dominant social group and individual choice
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

I can determine who influences my decisions

I can determine which choices I make for myself

Essential Questions:

How do we make choices?

Prerequisite Learning: Knowledge of the forms of power (influence, force, authority)

Instructional Strategy: Lecture, handouts, think pair share

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

Handouts filled in and handed in

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):                            Time: 2-3 Minutes

  • Ask students to hand in their KWL charts from last class

Development:                                             Time: 35 minutes

  • Ask students what they know or remember learning about influence, write on board (3 minutes)                           
  • Think pair share. Students will have one minute to think about choices they make in their own lives. They will pair with who they are sitting next to and discuss who helps them make decisions. I will then pick students to share with the class what they talked about. (7 minutes)
  • I will then pass out the handout to students
  • I will explain the handout and ask the students to complete it. They can talk with their partners but it must be on topic. (20 minutes)
  • I will ask for students to raise their hands and share one example of what they wrote. (5 minutes)

Learning Closure:

  • Ask students to hand in their handouts (2-3 minutes)                                   
Materials/Resources:

  • Whiteboard
  • Dry erase markers
  • Pencils (32)
  • Handouts (32)

Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation:

  • Working independently on the handout rather than being able to talk to neighbours if noise level is too high or students are too loud during the lesson

Management Strategies:

Safety Considerations:

  • Make sure floor is clear for students and my own movement
Stage 4: Reflection

Grade Six – Power: Force, Authority and Influence Plan

Check it out on Google Docs

Subject/Grade:  6 Social Studies        Lesson Title: Power: Force, Authority and Influence                            Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

Outcome: PA6.1: Examine the relationship between an individual’s power and authority and the power and authority of others.

Indicators:

(a) Illustrate the forms of power (an individual or a group’s ability to influence): force, authority, and influence (voice) with respect to their personal lives (e.g., force: pushing someone, saying something hurtful; authority: being elected class representative, being invited to act or speak on behalf of the group, inviting others to act or speak on behalf of the group; influence: speak out on their behalf or on the behalf of others).
(b) Give examples of the forms of power (force: gangs, bullying; authority: leadership of an organization; influence: clergy, charisma) in the local community.
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

I can describe the three forms of power: force, authority and influence

I can think about and describe examples of these forms of power that are in my own community

Essential Questions:

What is power?

What are force, authority and influence?

Prerequisite Learning: N/A

Instructional Strategy: Direct teaching, brainstorming pairs, KWL chart

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

KWL chart, drawings (3 total) and sentences (9 total)

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):                               Length of Time: 5 minutes

  • Have the definitions of power and authority written on the board. Ask students to guess which one is which. Power: ability to direct or influence the behavior of others or the course of events. Authority: the power or right to give orders and make decisions.

Development:              (70 minutes including 10 minute break)

– KWL Chart. Ask students to write on their chart what they know and what they want to know about power and authority.  (10 minutes)

-Ask students what decisions they made for themselves today, and what decisions were made for them. Make a venn diagram on the board and write student examples. (5-10 minutes)

– Brainstorming: Pair students (who they’re sitting with). Ask them to brainstorm on a web what examples in their communities of influence, force and authority (Time: 10 minutes)

Brain Break –  10 minutes – Heads up 7up (example of power/ifluence/authority)

-Ask students to pick one powerful figure and one authority figure and draw one picture of each. Students must also provide three sentences describing why the figure is considered powerful or an authority figure.  (30 minutes)

Learning Closure:      

-Finish KWL chart. Each student will write what they learned about force, influence and authority.                               Time: 5-10 minutes

Materials/Resources:

  • KWL Chart for each student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Drawing/colouring materials (pencil crayons, markers)
  • Loose leaf or 8×10” printer paper for each student for pictures
  • Whiteboard
  • Dry Erase markers

Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation: Another game could be used for a brain break instead of Heads Up 7up that demonstrates power/authority

Management Strategies:

  • Deal with the problem not the child
  • Be alert to those who are not paying attention/fooling around

Safety Considerations:

  • Making sure floor is clear for student movement
Stage 4: Reflection

 

 

Grade Six – Badminton (Drop Shot) Plan

Check it out on Google Docs: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v8mZsT0ZryUu-MriaPsHuJZ2nFQ2YvprmNFjCCou81E/edit?usp=sharing

Subject/Grade: Grade 6 Phys. Ed        Lesson Title: Drop Shot          Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

 

Outcome: PE6.5, Demonstrate a progression towards control in complex movement skills that combine locomotor (traveling) skills, non-locomotor (non-traveling) skills, and manipulative (moving objects) skills as they apply to games and sports (e.g., lay-up in basketball, spike in volleyball, dribbling to a shot in soccer, gathering a grounder and throwing to a base in softball, stick handling to a shot in floor hockey, receiving and sending the double balls in double ball).

Indicators:

(g) Combine locomotor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills to progress in the development of consistency in performance of individual skills that are sport specific (e.g., bowling delivery, soccer throw-in, badminton short serve, volleyball underhand pass to target).
(j) Willingly and appropriately apply principles of practice while practising skills at a high level of engagement.
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

I can develop a consistent drop-shot

I can understand when the drop-shot is used in the game of Badminton

I can demonstrate my ability to perform a drop-shot

Essential Questions:

What is a drop shot?

When is it used in the game of Badminton?

Prerequisite Learning:

Knowledge of the rules of Badminton

Instructional Strategy: Lecture/demonstration, drills

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

Formative: Demonstration by students of their ability during drill

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):

  • Ask students to do their regular warm up.
  • Ask students to get one pair of goggles and one racket.   Length of Time: 5-7 minutes

Development:

  • Demonstrate drop-shot for students. Have students standing in a horizontal line facing me (3-5 minutes)
  • Ask students to practice the motion a few times (5 minutes)
  • Number students 1,2,3, Tell students which net is #1, #2 and #3, ask students to line up behind their corresponding nets, half on each side (5 minutes).
  • Explain drill to students while they are lined up waiting:
    • The student at the front of the line on one side (I will decide which side and make it clear to students) will serve the birdie, while the student at the front of the line on the other side of the net will attempt a drop-shot. Students should not be rallying, but each hitting the birdie once. Once they have served/preformed the drop-shot they will go to the back of the line on the opposite side of the net.                                      Time: 15 minutes

Learning Closure:

  • Ask students to return the birdies and rackets and help take down the badminton nets                          Time: 5 minutes
Materials/Resources:

  • Birdies
  • Badminton Rackets
  • Badminton Nets
  • Goggles
  • Whistle

Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation:

  • Length of practice-motion time could be extended depending on how students are doing/ if they need more time
  • Without whistle: Using a hand up in the air to motion that I would like the rackets placed on the ground

Management Strategies:

  • Make sure I am visible to all students at all times in the gymnasium to ensure that they can see when I’d like them to place their rackets on the ground if no whistle available

Safety Considerations:

  • Goggles must be worn by all students unless they are wearing glasses
  • Students must be wearing gym-shoes and not sock-feet
Stage 4: Reflection