Grade Six – A Boy and a Mountain (Suspense) Plan

Check it out on Google Docs

Subject/Grade:  6 ELA Lesson Title:  A Boy and a Mountain Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

Outcome: Select and use appropriate strategies to construct meaning before (e.g., considering what they know and need to know about topic), during (e.g., making connections to prior knowledge and experiences), and after (e.g., drawing conclusions) viewing, listening, and reading.

Indicators:

    • predict what text will be about (e.g., consider the accompanying visuals and headings)
    • connect and construct meaning (e.g., make connections to own lives and contemporary issues and problems; make connections to self, text, and world)
  • ask questions (e.g., ask questions to check understanding and evaluate text’s message)
  • respond personally (giving support from text) (e.g., support thinking beyond the text with specific evidence based on personal experience)
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

-I can make predictions about the story based on the title and pictures

-I can make self, text and world connections about the story

-I can ask questions when I am not understanding what the story is telling me

-I can think about why this story is suspenseful, and reflect on suspenseful situations in my own life

Essential Questions:

PRE:

What do you think this story will be about?

What makes this story suspenseful?

What are some key elements of a suspenseful story?

A Boy

Prerequisite Learning: Need to be able to read, write and understand suspense.

Instructional Strategy: Read aloud, written reflection

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

Non-Formative: brainstorming, noting those students who ask questions when they don’t understand

Formative: Written reflection

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):                               Length of Time: 5 minutes

Ask the students what they have learned this far about suspense (they began the unit last week)  and respond to those who raise hands. We will write these answers on the board for reference

Development:                              Time: 60 Minutes

  • Before the story is read, we will pass out a handout that asks the following questions:
  • From looking at the pictures and title, what predictions can you make about the story?
  • Write down one text to text, text to world and text to self connection you found in the story.
  • Was there anything in the story you didn’t understand or want to know more about?
  • What made this story suspenseful?
  • Do you remember a suspenseful time from your own life?
  • We will ask students only to answer the first question before reading
  • The story is read aloud by the class. We will ask for volunteers to read, and if no one volunteers we will choose. Students will read 2 lines each until the end of the story. If someone wants to volunteer to read the next line, they will raise their hand.
  • After the story is complete, we will ask the students to fill out the handout

                                 

      Learning Closure:  We will ask for volunteers to share one of                      their connections. Ideally this would be about ten students but can be adjusted according to time.

                                       Time: 15 minutes

Materials/Resources:

  • Nelson Literacy books for each student (32)
  • Handout for each student (32)
  • Whiteboard
  • Dry erase markers

Possible Adaptations:

Differentiation: If the development goes quicker than 60 minutes, the closure will include more student examples to compensate time.

Management Strategies:

-Ask students before hand to raise their hand if they have questions or would like to volunteer

-Use our presence as a management strategy, moving around the room and placing a hand on shoulders of students who need to refocus

-Raise hand and hold it up to refocus students if they are discussing and at beginning of class

Safety Considerations:

-Students might relate to what the story is about and might be emotionally affected by this discussion

Stage 4: Reflection
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Grade Six – My Choices: Who Influences Me Plan

Check it out on Google Docs

Subject/Grade: Grade 6 Social Studies     Lesson Title: My Choices: Who Influences Me      Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

Outcome:

Examine the relationship between an individual’s power and authority and the power and authority of others.

Indicator:

(a) Illustrate the forms of power (an individual or a group’s ability to influence): force, authority, and influence (voice) with respect to their personal lives (e.g., force: pushing someone, saying something hurtful; authority: being elected class representative, being invited to act or speak on behalf of the group, inviting others to act or speak on behalf of the group; influence: speak out on their behalf or on the behalf of others).
(f) Explain choices young people must make in reconciling the tensions between the dominant social group and individual choice
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

I can determine who influences my decisions

I can determine which choices I make for myself

Essential Questions:

How do we make choices?

Prerequisite Learning: Knowledge of the forms of power (influence, force, authority)

Instructional Strategy: Lecture, handouts, think pair share

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

Handouts filled in and handed in

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):                            Time: 2-3 Minutes

  • Ask students to hand in their KWL charts from last class

Development:                                             Time: 35 minutes

  • Ask students what they know or remember learning about influence, write on board (3 minutes)                           
  • Think pair share. Students will have one minute to think about choices they make in their own lives. They will pair with who they are sitting next to and discuss who helps them make decisions. I will then pick students to share with the class what they talked about. (7 minutes)
  • I will then pass out the handout to students
  • I will explain the handout and ask the students to complete it. They can talk with their partners but it must be on topic. (20 minutes)
  • I will ask for students to raise their hands and share one example of what they wrote. (5 minutes)

Learning Closure:

  • Ask students to hand in their handouts (2-3 minutes)                                   
Materials/Resources:

  • Whiteboard
  • Dry erase markers
  • Pencils (32)
  • Handouts (32)

Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation:

  • Working independently on the handout rather than being able to talk to neighbours if noise level is too high or students are too loud during the lesson

Management Strategies:

Safety Considerations:

  • Make sure floor is clear for students and my own movement
Stage 4: Reflection

Grade Six – Power: Force, Authority and Influence Plan

Check it out on Google Docs

Subject/Grade:  6 Social Studies        Lesson Title: Power: Force, Authority and Influence                            Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

Outcome: PA6.1: Examine the relationship between an individual’s power and authority and the power and authority of others.

Indicators:

(a) Illustrate the forms of power (an individual or a group’s ability to influence): force, authority, and influence (voice) with respect to their personal lives (e.g., force: pushing someone, saying something hurtful; authority: being elected class representative, being invited to act or speak on behalf of the group, inviting others to act or speak on behalf of the group; influence: speak out on their behalf or on the behalf of others).
(b) Give examples of the forms of power (force: gangs, bullying; authority: leadership of an organization; influence: clergy, charisma) in the local community.
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

I can describe the three forms of power: force, authority and influence

I can think about and describe examples of these forms of power that are in my own community

Essential Questions:

What is power?

What are force, authority and influence?

Prerequisite Learning: N/A

Instructional Strategy: Direct teaching, brainstorming pairs, KWL chart

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

KWL chart, drawings (3 total) and sentences (9 total)

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):                               Length of Time: 5 minutes

  • Have the definitions of power and authority written on the board. Ask students to guess which one is which. Power: ability to direct or influence the behavior of others or the course of events. Authority: the power or right to give orders and make decisions.

Development:              (70 minutes including 10 minute break)

– KWL Chart. Ask students to write on their chart what they know and what they want to know about power and authority.  (10 minutes)

-Ask students what decisions they made for themselves today, and what decisions were made for them. Make a venn diagram on the board and write student examples. (5-10 minutes)

– Brainstorming: Pair students (who they’re sitting with). Ask them to brainstorm on a web what examples in their communities of influence, force and authority (Time: 10 minutes)

Brain Break –  10 minutes – Heads up 7up (example of power/ifluence/authority)

-Ask students to pick one powerful figure and one authority figure and draw one picture of each. Students must also provide three sentences describing why the figure is considered powerful or an authority figure.  (30 minutes)

Learning Closure:      

-Finish KWL chart. Each student will write what they learned about force, influence and authority.                               Time: 5-10 minutes

Materials/Resources:

  • KWL Chart for each student
  • Pencil for each student
  • Drawing/colouring materials (pencil crayons, markers)
  • Loose leaf or 8×10” printer paper for each student for pictures
  • Whiteboard
  • Dry Erase markers

Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation: Another game could be used for a brain break instead of Heads Up 7up that demonstrates power/authority

Management Strategies:

  • Deal with the problem not the child
  • Be alert to those who are not paying attention/fooling around

Safety Considerations:

  • Making sure floor is clear for student movement
Stage 4: Reflection

 

 

Grade Six – Badminton (Drop Shot) Plan

Check it out on Google Docs: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1v8mZsT0ZryUu-MriaPsHuJZ2nFQ2YvprmNFjCCou81E/edit?usp=sharing

Subject/Grade: Grade 6 Phys. Ed        Lesson Title: Drop Shot          Teacher: Kali Day

Stage 1: Identify Desired Results

Objectives/Outcome(s)/Indicator(s):

 

Outcome: PE6.5, Demonstrate a progression towards control in complex movement skills that combine locomotor (traveling) skills, non-locomotor (non-traveling) skills, and manipulative (moving objects) skills as they apply to games and sports (e.g., lay-up in basketball, spike in volleyball, dribbling to a shot in soccer, gathering a grounder and throwing to a base in softball, stick handling to a shot in floor hockey, receiving and sending the double balls in double ball).

Indicators:

(g) Combine locomotor, non-locomotor, and manipulative skills to progress in the development of consistency in performance of individual skills that are sport specific (e.g., bowling delivery, soccer throw-in, badminton short serve, volleyball underhand pass to target).
(j) Willingly and appropriately apply principles of practice while practising skills at a high level of engagement.
Key Understandings: (‘I Can’ statements)

I can develop a consistent drop-shot

I can understand when the drop-shot is used in the game of Badminton

I can demonstrate my ability to perform a drop-shot

Essential Questions:

What is a drop shot?

When is it used in the game of Badminton?

Prerequisite Learning:

Knowledge of the rules of Badminton

Instructional Strategy: Lecture/demonstration, drills

Stage 2: Determine Evidence for Assessing Learning

Formative: Demonstration by students of their ability during drill

Stage 3: Build Learning Plan

Set (Engagement):

  • Ask students to do their regular warm up.
  • Ask students to get one pair of goggles and one racket.   Length of Time: 5-7 minutes

Development:

  • Demonstrate drop-shot for students. Have students standing in a horizontal line facing me (3-5 minutes)
  • Ask students to practice the motion a few times (5 minutes)
  • Number students 1,2,3, Tell students which net is #1, #2 and #3, ask students to line up behind their corresponding nets, half on each side (5 minutes).
  • Explain drill to students while they are lined up waiting:
    • The student at the front of the line on one side (I will decide which side and make it clear to students) will serve the birdie, while the student at the front of the line on the other side of the net will attempt a drop-shot. Students should not be rallying, but each hitting the birdie once. Once they have served/preformed the drop-shot they will go to the back of the line on the opposite side of the net.                                      Time: 15 minutes

Learning Closure:

  • Ask students to return the birdies and rackets and help take down the badminton nets                          Time: 5 minutes
Materials/Resources:

  • Birdies
  • Badminton Rackets
  • Badminton Nets
  • Goggles
  • Whistle

Possible Adaptations/

Differentiation:

  • Length of practice-motion time could be extended depending on how students are doing/ if they need more time
  • Without whistle: Using a hand up in the air to motion that I would like the rackets placed on the ground

Management Strategies:

  • Make sure I am visible to all students at all times in the gymnasium to ensure that they can see when I’d like them to place their rackets on the ground if no whistle available

Safety Considerations:

  • Goggles must be worn by all students unless they are wearing glasses
  • Students must be wearing gym-shoes and not sock-feet
Stage 4: Reflection